10 Refreshing Fruit and Herb Infused Water Recipes

Did you know that drinking water is good for your heart and your teeth? Each sip cleans your mouth and helps wash away particles of food and other debris that could otherwise nourish oral bacteria, the American Dental Association reports. What’s more, in a six-year study of more than 20,000 people, those who drank five or more glasses of H2O …

A Diet Based on Your DNA

What’s the best diet for weight loss and cardiovascular wellness? When researchers compared four popular low-carb or low-fat diets, the results were puzzling. Over a 12-month period, some study participants lost 30 or more pounds on each of the diets, while others gained 10 pounds. What the researchers inadvertently proved was that the one-size-fits all approach doesn’t work for weight …

Which Is Worse for Your Heart: Saturated Fat or Sugar?

For 50 years, saturated fat–found in meat, butter, cheese, and many baked goods and fried foods–has been demonized as the no. 1 dietary villain in cardiovascular disease (CVD). Yet decades of research show that sugar is actually even worse for the heart than saturated fat. In fact, a diet high in sugar triples risk for fatal CVD, according to a …

Apple, Tarragon and Chicken Salad

Did you know that apples are called “nature’s toothbrush” because their slightly acidic nature and fiber-rich flesh help clean your teeth as you eat them? Here is an easy, delicious recipe for a heart- and tooth-healthy lunch or dinner. Ingredients 2 tart red apples (such as Cameo Apples) 2 celery stalks (diced) 2 chicken breasts (skinless, cooked, diced, about 2 …

Must-Have Kale Salad to Go

Here’s a tasty recipe, created by a White House chef, to take to work for a heart-healthy lunch on the go. Experiment with other ingredients too — there are dozens of recipes for salads in a jar, which I often bring to the office for my midday meal. Makes 4 servings, to be packed in individual 1-quart Mason jars with …

Five Easy Ways to Boost Your Heart Health This Summer

Good news from the research front: several studies show that heart attack risk is lowest in the summer, possibly because people typically exercise more in warm months, eat a lighter, healthier diet, and get more heart-protective vitamin D than they do in winter, when days are shorter. Use these five simple, science-backed tips to keep your ticker in top condition …