Moderate Drinking: Good or Bad for Your Heart Health?

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has canceled a $100 million study of the cardiovascular effects of drinking moderate amounts of alcohol amid concerns about industry funding and influence that might lead to a pro-alcohol bias. The study was supposed to compare rates of heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular events in 8,000 volunteers who would be randomly assigned to …

Most Doctors Don’t Know About This $20 Test for Hidden Heart Attack Risk

Celebrity fitness trainer Bob Harper thought he was in perfect health, until he suffered a near-fatal heart attack during a workout at a New York City gym and went into cardiac arrest. After a bystander performed CPR, the host of the hit TV show “The Biggest Loser” was rushed to the hospital where he spent two days in a coma, …

Mediterranean Diet vs. Vegetarian Diet – Which is Better for Your Heart?

“Let food be thy medicine,” Hippocrates advised centuries ago. Since then, hundreds of studies have explored which diet is healthiest. In one of the latest studies, researchers compared the effects of two low-calorie diets – a Mediterranean-style eating plan and a vegetarian diet – to see which one worked best for weight loss and improving the participants’ cardiovascular risk profile. In earlier research, both …

The Habit that Helps Beat the Heart Attack Gene, Cutting Risk by 50%

About 50% of Americans carry genes that raise their risk for heart attacks and strokes, such as 9P21, often called “the heart attack gene.”  However, DNA doesn’t have to be destiny: Even if you have genetic risk for coronary heart disease (CHD), you can slash it by about 50% if you’re physically fit, according to a study of nearly 500,000 …

Wonderful Ways Mindfulness Benefits Your Heart, Brain and Arteries

Did you know that chronic stress is a major risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading killer of Americans? A large study conducted in 52 countries around the world found that psychological factors (including stress) nearly tripled risk for a heart attack. Even newer research suggests that chronic tension is just as hazardous to your arterial health as smoking! …

7 Heart-Smart Weight- Loss Tips that Really Work

Nearly 40 percent of Americans — about 100 million people — are obese, according to a new study published in Journal of the American Medical Association. That’s alarming because obesity (defined as a body mass index, or BMI, of 30 or higher) greatly increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), type 2 diabetes, several forms of cancer and many other chronic or life-threatening illnesses. Another new study …

An Easy Four-Step Plan to Optimize Your Oral Health & Prevent Heart Attacks

Following a simple four-step plan to protect your oral health can lower your risk for heart attacks, stroke, diabetes, colds, flu, arthritis and even some forms of cancer. In fact, a recent study of more than 5,600 older adults found that one of the simplest –and most effective – keys to a long life is combining regular dental checkups with …

The New Blood Pressure Guidelines: 4 Things You Need to Know

Nearly half of U.S. adults (46%) are now considered to have high blood pressure under new guidelines from the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology. The guidelines set a lower threshold for a disorder often called  “the silent killer” because hypertension typically causes few or no symptoms as it wreaks slow mayhem on your blood vessels and vital …

Lifesaving Facts Women Need to Know About Their No. 1 Killer: Heart Disease

After a heart attack, women are three times more likely than men to die due to alarmingly unequal care, according to a new study published in Journal of the American Heart Association. The researchers also found that women who had the most serious type of heart attack (in which a coronary artery is totally blocked) had a 34% lower chance …

The Lifesaving Importance of Getting Dental Care at Least Twice a Year

If you haven’t seen your dental provider lately, you’re missing out on key screenings and treatments that could help you avoid dangerous health threats, including heart attacks, strokes, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, some forms of cancer and possibly even Alzheimer’s disease. All of these disorders, and many others, have been linked to poor oral health in recent studies. Here’s more …